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Congresswoman Claudia Tenney Opposes Bills Eroding Constitutionally Protected Second Amendment Rights

March 11, 2021

Washington, D.C. -- Congresswoman Tenney voted “No” today on two gun-related measures that would weaken our constitutionally protected right to keep and bear arms under the Second Amendment. The legislation, H.R. 1446 and H.R. 8, would impose new burdensome background check requirements on the purchase or transfer of firearms and expand the current 3-day background check period to 10 days or longer. These new restrictions will negatively impact law-abiding gun owners and do little to prevent criminals from acquiring firearms. 

“The legislation proposed today would create arbitrary delays on background checks for law-abiding Americans, weakening their constitutionally protected right to keep and bear arms,” said Congresswoman Claudia Tenney. “These bills are poorly written and could open the door for sportsmen and hunters to be treated the same as violent criminals. A sportsman could potentially face charges for simply storing a gun with a fellow hunter while a farmer could similarly run afoul by simply lending a firearm to a fellow farmer. These progressive gun bills are out of touch with rural America and treat honest gun owners like criminals."

Congresswoman Tenney this week co-sponsored the Second Amendment Guarantee Act introduced by New York Congresswoman Elise Stefanik. This bill would override unconstitutional provisions in the SAFE Act that prohibit law-abiding New Yorkers from purchasing, transferring, and owning legal firearms. It would ensure that states cannot ban the manufacture, sale, importation, or possession of any rifle or shotgun lawfully available under federal law.

Congresswoman Tenney has always been a strong defender of the Second Amendment. In the New York State Assembly, she was the first member to introduce legislation to repeal Governor Cuomo’s “SAFE” Act. In her previous term in Congress, she championed the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, fighting to expand Americans’ access to concealed carry permits. New York’s 22nd Congressional District is proudly home to Remington Arms (Ilion, NY), the oldest gun manufacturer in the United States. 

Congresswoman Tenney is also the co-sponsor of several other bills to protect our Second Amendment rights, close loopholes, and promote firearm safety, including:  

  • H.R. 1534, the protecting the Rights to Keep and Bear Arms Act - This bill prohibits the President from using a declaration of a national emergency to impose additional restrictive gun control measures.
    
  • H.R. 1518, the 21st Century NICS Act - This bill allows the FBI to access the N-Dex System when performing a background check under NICS for the potential sale of a firearm. This database aggregates criminal records from various local, state, and the federal agencies to provide critical information to the criminal justice community. This is a more targeted and effective background check bill. Had it been in place previously, this bill may have prevented the tragic Charleston shooting.
     
  • H.R. 194, DOJ Report on NICS Prosecutions - The bill requires the Office of the Inspector General in the Department of Justice to report to Congress on the number of firearm transfer delayed denials issued by the NICS that are referred to the ATF for investigation. The report must include prosecutions resulting from such investigations and the number of firearms recovered by the ATF in cases in which a denial was issued by the system after a firearm was transferred.
     
  • H.R. 1604, STOP Straw Purchases Act - This legislation would strengthen federal law and make it easier to prosecute criminal straw purchasers and gun traffickers. It would increase the maximum punishment for the purchaser and the receiver, who transfers a firearm with a reasonable cause to believe that it will be used in a drug crime or crime of violence, to include a fine up to $750,000, and a prison term for up to 25 years. Current law calls for a fine of up to $250,000 and a prison term of up to 10 years.