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My Votes Explained

I am working to bring transparency to Congress, and part of that effort includes keeping you updated on what bills passed the House each week and how I voted on each piece of legislation. If you have any questions related to my votes, please do not hesitate to contact my Washington office at 202-225-3665.

TOTAL VOTES EXPLAINED: 96

October 22, 2021
Today I voted “No” on H.R. 3110, the Providing Urgent Maternal Protections for Nursing Mothers Act. This legislation would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to add new rigid requirements for employers to provide a non-bathroom location and time for women to pump breastmilk for up to two years after the birth of a child. Currently twenty states, including New York, have a similar requirement. In addition, hourly employees are already covered under current federal law. This bill also dramatically expands penalties for employers who are unable to accommodate these new requirements. As written, this top-down rule unfortunately does not account for the specific limitations of certain workplaces such as the agriculture industry. Its expansive mandate and lack of clarity would also open employers to additional frivolous lawsuits. While this legislation is well intentioned, we need a more well-thought out, targeted solution that gives workplaces the flexibility to succeed and empower their workers. This bill passed the House by a vote of 276-149. 

October 21, 2021
I voted “No” on H.Res. 730, a Resolution recommending that the House of Representatives find Stephen K. Bannon in contempt of Congress for refusal to comply with a subpoena issued by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol.  Instead of pursuing a valid legislative purpose, this subpoena serves a partisan goal and targets a private citizen, threatening his First Amendment rights. This Select Committee takes power out of the hands of the House of Representative’s standing committees of jurisdiction, which are entirely capable of conducting a thorough investigation. We should return power to these standing congressional committees and not a body like this Select Committee, which is highly partisan and in fact “bipartisan” in name only. This resolution passed the House by a vote of 229-202.

October 20, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4611, the DHS Software Supply Chain Risk Management Act. This legislation will direct the Department of Homeland Security to modernize its computer systems and adopt best practices to ensure all software components are safe and secure. It will also require all DHS contractors to identify the origins of each component of the software they provide to the department. This bill passed the House by a vote of 412-2.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 2379, the State Opioid Response Grant Authorization. Since 2000 the opioid crisis has devastated countless communities across the country, killing over 550,000 nationwide. This commonsense and bipartisan legislation will authorize $9 billion over six years in flexible funding for State Opioid Response (SOR) Grants and Tribal Opioid Response (TOR) Grants to fight this epidemic of addiction and abuse. This bill passed the House by a vote of 380-46.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 654, the Drug Free Communities Pandemic Relief Act. This bipartisan legislation will grant the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) the authority to waive the program’s local matching requirements. Many organizations and municipalities have had trouble meeting this requirement during the COVID-19 pandemic and it is important we continue to act to ensure we keep drugs off the street and away from our loved ones. This bill passed the House by a vote of 395-30.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 3635, the Strengthening America’s Strategic National Stockpile Act. This bill will change the management of the Strategic National Stockpile and will help reduce dependence on foreign countries for critical supplies, boost domestic manufacturing, and improving transparency. It will improve stockpile maintenance to ensure it is prepared for a crisis, increase the manufacturing of supplies in America, authorize the federal government to further assist states in building up their own stockpiles, and require further transparency in management of the stockpile. This bill passed the House by a vote of 397-22.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 3919, the Secure Equipment Act. This bill would prohibit the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) from providing licenses for telecommunications equipment from companies that pose a national security threat. It will further protect U.S. security by keeping companies like Chinese state directed Huawei and ZTE out of the U.S. telecommunications network. This bill passed the House by a vote of 420-4.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4032, the Open RAN Outreach Act. This bill would promote a competitive market for open and interoperable network equipment, which will enable small and rural networks to use affordable, trusted vendors to provide 5G equipment. This will ensure small and rural providers are not subject to the influence of the Chinese Communist Party and high-risk companies like Huawei. This bill passed the House by a vote of 410-17.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4067, the Communications Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Act. This bill would direct the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to create a council to make recommendations on increasing the security, reliability and interoperability of communications networks. It would require biannual reports on the commission’s work and its recommendations for strengthening our communications networks. This bill passed the House by a vote of 397-29.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4028, the Information and Communication Technology Strategy Act. This Act requires the Secretary of Commerce to submit to Congress within one year a report regarding the information and communication technology supply chain that identifies technology critical to U.S. competitiveness as well as the industrial capacity of US ITC vendors and of trusted ITC vendors that produce items critical to U.S. economic competitiveness. This bill passed the House by a vote of 413-14.

October 19, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 1029, the Free Veterans from Fees Act. This bill waives the application fee for veterans trying to obtain a special-use permit for events held at war memorials in Washington, D.C. administered by the National Park Service. This will make it easier for our veterans to gather, celebrate, and remember the service they and their fellow service members rendered to our country. This bill passed the House by a vote of 421-3.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4089, the Darren Drake Act. This legislation directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to devise protocols to help vehicle rental companies and car dealerships report suspicious behavior to law enforcement. The bill is designed to help reduce and prevent the use of rented vehicles in violent attacks and acts of terrorism. This bill passed the House by a vote of 379-51.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4369, the National Centers of Excellence in Advanced and Continuous Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Act of 2021. Recent drug shortages and reliance on foreign sourced pharmaceutical ingredients threatening patients’ access to essential medications. This legislation will authorize grants to further develop the emerging, faster continuous drug manufacturing technique and ensure the United States is the home of pharmaceutical innovation. This bill passed the House by a vote of 368-56.

October 2, 2021
Today I voted “Yes” on H.R.5434, the Surface Transportation Extension Act. Unfortunately, due to mismanagement by Speaker Pelosi, authorization for federal highway programs expired midnight on Thursday. This resulted in the furloughing of 3,700 federal employees and the halting of multiple highway and road projects funded through the highway trust fund. All this disruption could have been easily avoided by a vote earlier this week, however House Democrats were too focused on ramming through their own liberal agenda. This legislation thankfully will provide a clean bipartisan extension of funding for the next 30 days so these essential programs and projects can resume. I hope in the next few weeks we can work on a longer-term authorization that is free from partisan riders. This bill passed the House by a vote of 365-51.

September 30, 2021
Today, I voted “No” on H.R. 5305, the Extending Government Funding and Delivering Emergency Assistance Act. This stop-gap bill lacks critical policies to constrain the Biden Administration from further enacting its radical agenda, including one-size-fits-all overreaching federal vaccine mandates. The bill also includes provisions completely unrelated to government funding, such as providing benefits and Real IDs to Afghan nationals at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security Secretary, who I recently called on to resign for his failure to secure our southern border. I could not support a funding bill that concealed deeply flawed policy provisions without even the opportunity for debate or amendments. This is not how the American people expect Congress to operate. This bill passed by a vote of 254-175.

I voted “Yes” to H.R. 3533, To establish occupational series for Federal positions in software development, software engineering, data science, and data management. This bill would require the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) to establish or update existing career pathways for Federal Government positions in software development, software engineering, data science, and data management. It is critical that the U.S. government maintain a well-equipped professional workforce. In the 21st century, this includes cyber-related jobs such as data scientists and computer engineers to handle cybersecurity, respond to hacks and other digital-crises, and fulfill other critical needs. I supported this legislation to provide the federal government with the tools it needs to be effective without additional spending or waste. This bill passed by a vote of 416-9.

September 29, 2021
Today I voted “Yes” on H.R. 3599, the Federal Rotational Cyber Workforce Program Act. Over the past years we have learned the importance of robust cybersecurity measures to guard the privacy of Americans and safeguard critical infrastructure. This bill will create a Federal Rotational Cyber Workforce Program within the Office of Personnel Management to allow cybersecurity personnel in federal agencies to do temporary rotations in other government agencies. These placements will increase communication between the different agencies, allowing them to share cybersecurity tactics and best practices more easily. This bill passed the House by a vote of 410-15.

I voted "No" on H.R. 1204, the District of Columbia Chief Financial Officer Home Rule Act, which would allow the DC Government to irresponsibly increase the salary of the DC Chief Financial Officer at the cost of taxpayers. This bill required a 2/3 majority to pass and failed in the House by a vote of 259-170.

I voted "No" on the House Amendment to S. 1301, that gives a blank check to Speaker Pelosi, completely suspending the debt limit until December 2022. In the past, Republicans and Democrats have come together multiple times to raise the debt ceiling. However, this time Speaker Pelosi has again completely cut House Republicans out of the process, forcing through a bill that would clear the way for her multi-trillion-dollar deficit fueled takeover of the American economy. It would be deeply irresponsible to clear the way for a plan so out of step with the priorities of the American people. This bill passed the House by a vote of 219-212.

September 28, 2021
I voted “No” on H.R. 1693, the EQUAL Act. While I understand the intent of this legislation, it did not include meaningful input provided from the law enforcement community or adequately address their concerns. Crack cocaine is generally more accessible in communities and reducing penalties for those arrested with crack cocaine could make it harder for law enforcement to keep these drugs off the streets. With violent crime at a multi-decade high, this is the wrong time for us to take important tools away from our brave officers. This bill passed the House by a vote of 361-66.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4981, to amend the Fentanyl Sanctions Act. This bill amends the previous Fentanyl Sanctions Act by extending certain deadlines, allowing the Commission on Combating Synthetic Opioid Trafficking more time to develop solutions to combat the flow of synthetic opioids into the United States. This bill passed the House by a vote of 410-14.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4250, the War Crimes Rewards Expansion Act. This bill provides the Department of State with more resources to authorize rewards for information that may lead to the arrest, conviction, or extradition of foreign nationals wanted for alleged war crimes, genocide, and other crimes against humanity. This bill passed the House by a vote of 412-9. 

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 1228, the Libya Stabilization Act. The conflict in Libya has seen horrific human rights abuses and the collapse of democracy. This bill authorizes U.S. sanctions against persons who contribute, directly or indirectly, to the violence in Libya. Additionally, the bill calls for humanitarian assistance to those suffering from the side effects of the conflict, including food, shelter, and medical care. This bill passed the House by a vote of 386-35.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4686, the Cambodia Democracy Act. Cambodia is suffering from extensive government corruption that undermines democracy and contributes to a deteriorating human rights situation. This bill urges the President to impose sanctions on the senior Cambodian officials and military personnel responsible for these autrocities. This bill passed the House by a vote of 403-17.

I voted “Yes” on S. 848, the Consider Teachers Act. For the past 12 years many recipients of the TEACH Grant program have been hit by unexpected debt as small administrative errors turned their grants into loans that must be paid back with interest. This is unfair to these recipients, who serve as teachers in high-need, often underserved communities. As a solution, this legislation will fix the problem, providing more flexibility and efficiency in the TEACH grant program so these grant dollars can be used more effectively with less bureaucracy. This bill passed the House by a vote of 406-16.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 1154, the Great Dismal Swamp National Heritage Area Act, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to assess the sustainability and feasibility of creating a study area known as the Great Swamp National Heritage Area throughout Virginia and North Carolina. This study would determine whether the area has natural, historic and cultural resources representing different aspects of the people and culture of the United States, and whether it is worthy of recognition and continued use. This bill passed the House by a vote of 391-36.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 2617, the Performance Enhancement Reform Act. This bill would reform the process for drafting performance goals for federal agencies, increasing collaboration and improving how the government delivers resources to the American people. This legislation will integrate direct feedback from key stakeholders, improving services for American families and small businesses. This bill passed the House by a vote of 414-10.

September 24, 2021
Today, I voted “No” on H.R. 3755, the misleadingly named Women’s Health Protection Act of 2021. This radical bill is nothing more than a veiled attempt to upend current federal and state limitations on abortion in order to allow abortion on demand until birth. It would also fully legalize discriminatory abortions on the basis of the baby’s sex, race and disability. Contrary to its title, this legislation would remove protections for women such as laws shielding women from coerced abortions and laws requiring parental involvement for minors. Finally, it undermines the foundational American values of freedom of religion and belief, weakening conscience protections that shield medical professionals if they refuse to participate in an abortion. These radical proposals are wrong and completely out of step with the views of the American people. This partisan bill passed the House by a vote of 218-211.

September 23, 2021
Today I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4350, FY22 National Defense Authorization Act. This legislation provides our military with the resources it needs to defend the nation, supports servicemembers, and hold the Administration accountable for its disastrous withdrawal from Afghanistan. Specifically, the bill reverses President Biden’s reckless cuts to our national security by boosting the defense topline by nearly $25 billion, ensuring growth of 5% of FY21. It also authorizes a 2.7% pay increase for servicemembers and extends military recruitment and retention bonuses and special pay authorities. This year’s NDAA prohibits the dishonorable discharge for servicemembers who refuse COVID-19 vaccinations, prohibits the funding of medical research in China, and includes vital provisions requiring transparency over the lifting of sanctions on Iran. The NDAA will help safeguard the United States, counter threats, and support our service men and women. While I did not agree with every provision in this bill, its passage prioritizes policies to strengthen our defenses, improve readiness, and advance research and development that will give our military forces critical advantages. Importantly, it included six of my amendments to boost investments in quantum computing in Rome, hold Iran accountable, and counter China’s malign activity. This legislation passed by a vote of 316-113.

September 21, 2021
Today I voted “Yes” on S. 1828, the HAVANA Act. This bill provides additional financial assistance to American public servants suffering from “Havana Syndrome.” Since 2016, more than 40 U.S. Embassy staff in Havana, at least a dozen U.S. diplomats at the U.S. Consulate in Guangzhou, and several more around the world have incurred brain injuries from likely directed energy attacks. This bill will provide the CIA Director and U.S. Secretary of State with the authorities they need to properly assist those U.S. personnel affected. It is important these “Havana Syndrome” victims are not tied up in endless bureaucracy and are able to receive the care and compensation they deserve. This bill passed the House by a vote of 427-0.

Today I also voted “No” on H.R. 5305, the Extending Government Funding and Delivery Emergency Assistance Act, a short-term spending bill that also raises the debt limit. In the past Democrats and Republicans have come together to address the debt ceiling and fund the government, however Speaker Pelosi and Leader Schumer have prioritized their bitterly partisan agenda that completely shuts Republicans out of the legislative process. This legislation would suspend the debt limit through December 2022, giving Speaker Pelosi a blank check to add trillions to our national debt and raise taxes on hardworking New Yorkers. In addition, it also cuts $1 billion for Israel’s Iron Dome program, an important defensive technology used to protect innocent civilians from rocket attacks, including American citizens in Israel. This is another example of the far-left driving the House Democrats’ priorities. It is absolutely wrong for Speaker Pelosi and House Democrats to oppose Israel’s right to self-defense. If Democrats want to unilaterally push these terrible proposals forward and add trillions to our national debt without input, accountability, or transparency, then they bear the sole responsibility of addressing the consequences of their disastrous policies. This bill passed the House by a vote of 220-211.

 

September 20, 2021
Today I voted “Yes” H.R. 5293, the Department of Veterans Affairs Expiring Authorities Act of 2021. This bill will ensure that our veterans have continued access to crucial VA benefits. This includes much-needed services like dental insurance and travel to health appointments.  This bipartisan legislation was passed by a vote of 423-0. 

Today I voted “Yes” on S. 189, the Veterans’ Compensation Cost-of-Living Adjustment Act of 2021. This bill will increase the rates of compensation for veterans with service-connected disabilities, as well as the rates of dependency and indemnity compensation for eligible survivors of disabled veterans. Especially with high increases to the cost of living over the past several months, our veterans need this help now more than ever. This bipartisan legislation was passed by a vote of 423-0.

August 24, 2021
Today I voted “No” on S. Con. Res. 14, a resolution to initiate the reconciliation process for the Democrat’s $3.5 trillion spending plan. It is astonishing that at a time when Americans are facing skyrocketing inflation, Speaker Pelosi and many in Congress believe the appropriate solution is to raise taxes and force Americans to pay for one of the most expensive and wasteful spending bills in our nation’s history. This bill will advance a far-left social agenda, including the Green New Deal, mass amnesty, and an unparalleled expansion of the welfare state. In addition, it will also undermine the long-term viability of Medicare and increase taxes on our small businesses. This resolution passed the House by a vote of 220-212.

Today I voted “No” on H.R. 4, the John Lewis Voting Rights Act. The unconstitutional proposal undermines the integrity of our elections. The bill would overturn the Supreme Court’s 2013 ruling in Shelby County v. Holder, which effectively struck down the half-century old, outdated coverage formulas under Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act. It would also provide federal bureaucrats with veto power over commonsense voter ID laws and other safeguards to protect our sacred right to vote. Overall, this legislation is a sweeping power grab over elections, handing the power over voting laws from democratically accountable local officials to unelected federal bureaucrats in Washington. Because this bill is so bad for American democracy, Speaker Pelosi rushed it through the House of Representatives without a single committee hearing and never provided Members of Congress the opportunity to meaningfully change the bill through the amendment process.  This bill passed the House by a vote of 220-212.

August 23, 2021
Today I voted “Yes” on S. 325, to amend the Alyce Spotted Bear and Walter Soboleff Commission on Native Children Act. This bipartisan bill would extend the deadline for the commission’s report on native children by two years, giving the commission more time to develop recommendations on how to improve federal efforts and programs that benefit these youth. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the commission was not able to host in person hearings and listening sessions to gather public input. This extension is necessary to ensure the findings are appropriate and accurate. This bill passed the House by a vote of 418-7.

Today I voted “Yes” on S. 272, the Congressional Budget Justification Transparency Act. This commonsense bill would require full transparency with taxpayer money, directing the heads of federal agencies to regularly publish details on their agency’s funding and spending on their website. Americans deserve to know how their taxes are being spent and this bill is an important step toward maximizing government transparency. This bill passed the House by a vote of 423-1.

July 29, 2021
Today, I voted “No” on H.R. 4502, the Fiscal Year 2022 Minibus Appropriations Package. This bill irresponsibly increases discretionary spending by almost 20% while cutting defense spending significantly when accounting for inflation. These spending increases are on top of the $1.9 trillion partisan funding package Democrats already pushed through Congress just a few months ago, billions of which currently remain unspent. This bill also drops longstanding pro-life provisions such as the Hyde and Weldon Amendments, rolling back protections for health care professionals who do not wish to participate in abortions and requiring taxpayer funds to be spent on elective abortions for the first time since 1976. In addition, this package will undermine our nation’s energy independence and make it harder to source critical minerals domestically, increasing our reliances on adversaries like China for the rare earth elements we need to manufacture batteries, electronics, and solar panels. Finally, it includes several provisions that will undermine our immigration laws, allowing non-citizens to receive federal student aid and preventing the Department of Homeland Security from accessing the necessary information to enforce our laws and deport criminals. In a period with the highest inflation in 14 years and when small businesses and families are already suffering because of the Biden Adminsitration’s policies, we should be focused on proven solutions, not more failed progressive legislation that will worsen the current situation. This bill passed the House by a vote of 219-208.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 2278, which would allow for the creation of a “September 11th National Memorial Trail Route”. The trail will connect the National 9/11 Memorial and Museum in New York to the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial in Arlington, Virginia and to the Flight 93 National Memorial in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. We must never forget the most horrific terrorist attack ever to take place on American soil. This legislation will provide a proper tribute to those lives lost and serve as a reminder of our Nation’s resilience in the face of overwhelming adversity and fear. This bill passed the House by a vote of 423-0.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 2497, the Amache National Historical Site Act. This bipartisan bill establishes the Amache National Historic Site in Colorado as a unit of the National Park System. This will allow us to preserve and protect the site as well as teach future generations about its historical significance. This bill passed the House by a vote of 416-2.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 4300, the Alexander Lofgren VIP Act. This legislation will make the America the Beautiful Pass, which provides access to more than 2,000 federal recreation sites, including national parks and national wildlife refuges, free to our active-duty service members, veterans, and Gold Star Families. After putting so much on the line to defend our great Nation, our military and veterans should have the liberty to enjoy our federal recreation sites free of charge. I was honored to support this bipartisan legislation. This bill passed the House by a vote of 420-0.

July 28, 2021
I voted “No” on H.R. 4373, the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill for Fiscal Year 2022. This extremely partisan bill includes dangerously unprecedented funding increases while advancing unnecessary, progressive policy provisions. This bill alone includes a 12% increase over current levels, with $3 billion directed to climate change programs like the green climate fund, with little oversight or accountability. In addition, this bill includes alarming changes to long-standing language to protect the life of the unborn. Specifically, language that prohibits foreign aid from being used to pay for abortions was omitted entirely. The bill also includes other controversial changes, such as a permanent repeal of the Mexico City policy, which prohibits organizations that receive foreign assistance from performing abortions. Instead of working to craft bipartisan legislation for FY22 that Members on both sides of the aisle can support, Democrats chose to put forward a State and Foreign Operations Appropriations bill that is based on unrealistic and irresponsible funding levels and partisan policy provisions. This legislation was adopted by a vote of 217-212.

I voted “No” on H.R. 4346, the Legislative Branch Appropriations Bill for Fiscal Year 2022. I was deeply troubled by this partisan bill, which was reported out of the Appropriations Committee without a single Republican vote. House Democrats included massive spending increases at a time when our National Debt is approaching $29 trillion and without addressing the debt ceiling, which we are quickly approaching. H.R. 4346 includes a $582 million increase over this year’s spending levels and follows a budget outline that increases overall non-defense spending by a whopping 17%, while slashing defense spending when accounting for inflation. This partisan bill puts our Nation in an even more dangerous fiscal situation, fails to make meaningful reforms to the Capitol Police Board, and even allows Congress to hire illegal immigrants for the first time ever. I remain committed to a reasonable, bipartisan spending bill that puts our Nation back on a path to fiscal sanity. This bill unfortunately failed to meet that mark. It was bloated and included unnecessary, partisan policy provisions. This legislation was adopted by a vote of 215-207.

July 27, 2021
I voted “Yes” on S.957 - To direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to ensure that certain medical facilities of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) have physical locations for the disposal of controlled substances medications. This bipartisan bill will allow everyone in a community to use drop boxes at VA medical centers to dispose of unused controlled substance prescription medications. This bill will give our communities a way to safely get unneeded opioids off the street. It is an important step in combating the opioid epidemic and making our communities safer. This bill passed the House by a vote of 424-0. Having already passed the Senate, the bill will now head to the President to be signed into law.

I voted “Yes” on S. 1910, the Major Medical Facility Authorization Act. This bipartisan bill will authorize the Department of Veterans Affairs to move forward with projects at a select group of facilities to make these locations safer, more modern, and better able to meet the medical needs of veterans. Throughout my time in Congress, I have been a strong advocate for our veterans and ensuring the Department of Veterans Affairs spends its funds with the highest level of accountability. These commonsense projects authorized today will ensure veterans can access reliable, quality healthcare. This bill passed the House by a vote of 413-7. Having already passed the Senate, the bill will now head to the President to be signed into law.

July 26, 2021
TodayI voted “No” on the Motion to Table H.Res. 554. As I’ve said before, this is the first time in our Nation’s history that a Speaker of the House has blocked members of the minority party from serving on a Select Committee. Speaker Pelosi’s decision sets a terrible precedent for the House and makes clear that her priority from the start has been to preserve her power. While the Senate has produced bipartisan assessments of the events on January 6, Speaker Pelosi and Democratic leaders in the House have done nothing but play politics. Speaker Pelosi’s decision proves once again that she has no intention of overseeing a process that is fair or fact-based. This resolution passed the House by a vote of 218-197.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 1664. This bill authorizes the National Medal of Honor Museum Foundation to establish a commemorative work on Federal land in Washington D.C to honor the extraordinary acts of valor, selfless service, and sacrifice of Medal of Honor recipients. This legislation will allow generations to reflect on the honorable sacrifice and courage that our servicemembers have made in defense of our nation and freedom. This bill passed the House by a vote of 416-0.

Today I voted “Yes” on H.R. 2365. This bipartisan bill will extend the authorization for the establishment of a Gold Star Families Monument, which expired in January 2020. The monument will be built on federal land in Washington, D.C. by the Gold Star Mothers National Monument Foundation at no cost to the taxpayers. Our Gold Star Families have given so much for to the protection of our country and sacred freedoms, it is important that we remember their sacrifice. This bill passed the House by a vote of 412-0.

July 22, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 3985, the Allies Act. This bill ensures that Afghan interpreters and other allies who faithfully supported the U.S mission in Afghanistan are not left behind, while providing Congress with the necessary tools and authorities to conduct oversight of the program as needed. This legislation makes available 8,000 additional visas for the Afghan Special Immigrant Visa program and revises some requirements of the application process so that qualifying translators are not incorrectly or unfairly denied visas. Afghans who bravely stood by and assisted U.S. forces in Afghanistan have been and continue to be threatened and targeted by the Taliban. It is critical to protect the lives of the many Afghans and their families who faithfully worked side-by-side with U.S. forces over the years. The legislation passed by a vote of 407-16.

July 21, 2021
Today I voted “Yes” on H.R.2467, the PFAS Action Act of 2021. Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are large class of man-made chemicals that are very persistent in the environment—meaning they can often last for decades. Some of these substances can accumulate in the body over time and cause adverse health effects such as thyroid disorders and cancer. This bill will require the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to designate the dangerous, already commercially phased-out, PFOA and PFOS chemicals as hazardous substances, making areas with high contamination a priority for clean-up under the EPA’s Superfund program. Before being phased out, these chemicals were formerly used in firefighting foam and some water-repellents and are often found contaminating the areas around airports, industrial sites, and military bases like the former Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome. In addition, this bill will require the EPA to do health testing on PFAS chemicals currently in use and will ban new PFAS chemicals from entering the market until they are proven safe for humans. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 241-183.

July 20, 2021
I voted “Yes” on a package of 12 bipartisan bills, which passed by a bipartisan vote of 319-105. This package includes legislation that will strengthen our transportation network’s response to future and current health crises. This legislation will also strengthen our nation’s response to cyberattacks, securing our essential infrastructure and government services from attacks by criminals or adversaries like Russia and China.

The list of bills included in this package is below:

1. H.R. 1893 - Transportation Security Preparedness Act of 2021 
2. H.R. 1895 - Transportation Security Public Health Threat Preparedness Act of 2021 
3. H.R. 1877 - Security Screening During COVID-19 Act
4. H.R. 1871 - Transportation Security Transparency Improvement Act 
5. H.R. 2795 - DHS Blue Campaign Enhancement Act
7. H.R. 3138 - State and Local Cybersecurity Improvement Act 
8. H.R. 1833 - DHS Industrial Control Systems Capabilities Enhancement Act of 2021 
9. H.R. 2980 - Cybersecurity Vulnerability Remediation Act 
10. H.R. 3223 - CISA Cyber Exercise Act 
11. H.R. 3264 - Domains Critical to Homeland Security Act
12. H.R. 1850 - Supporting Research and Development for First Responders Act 
13. H.R. 3263 - DHS Medical Countermeasures Act

I voted “No” on H.R.2668, the Consumer Protection and Recovery Act. This bill radically expands the power of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), while failing to take the necessary steps to establish a national privacy framework or maintain sufficient administrative guardrails and oversight measures. While this bill gives sweeping new authorities to the FTC to target American companies, it completely fails to include protections that guarantee due process rights for Americans. In addition, the bill does nothing to aid in the fight against fraudsters, scammers, and those who acquire and abuse personal information for their own gain. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 221-205.

July 19, 2021
Today I voted “Yes” on H.R. 826, the Divided Families Reunification Act. This legislation will allow the State Department to work with the South Korean government on opportunities to reunite Korean Americans with their family members in North Korea. While the North Korean government continues to commit egregious human rights abuses and subject its citizens to absolute tyranny, the United States and its strong ally South Korea remain committed to protecting human rights and unifying families that have been kept apart for far too long. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 415-0. 

July 1, 2021
Today I voted “No” on H.R. 3684, the Invest in America Act. Investing in our nation’s infrastructure and rural communities is among my top priorities in Congress. But it is imperative that any infrastructure bill be bipartisan and drafted through an inclusive process that takes into account the views and feedback from all Members. Unfortunately, Democrats in the House have once again abandoned a bipartisan process in favor of a highly partisan one that prioritizes Green New Deal policies over commonsense solutions to rebuild our infrastructure and reinvest in rural America. This bill would bankrupt the Highway Trust fund in two years. It steers funds away from rural areas like New York’s 22nd District toward major cities and imposes one ideological mandate after another on local governments. The bill also fails to provide communities the flexibilities they need to make targeted investments. H.R. 3684 bewilderingly takes resources away from water and wastewater infrastructure, which we desperately need in New York, and diverts them toward climate projects. These and many other misguided priorities fall completely short of fixing our collapsing roads and aging water infrastructure or delivering for rural New Yorkers. My Republican colleagues in the House have introduced a better alternative – the Surface Transportation Advanced through Reform, Technology & Efficient Review (STARTER) Act. This is a fiscally-sound, long-term surface transportation reauthorization bill that provides historic levels of investment in America’s roads, bridges, and core infrastructure. It maximizes flexibility, cuts red tape, focuses on the needs of rural America, and fosters greater innovation. It is a much better bill than the one we considered today. H.R. 3684 passed the House by a vote of 221-201.

June 30, 2021
Today I voted "No" on H.Res. 503, to Establish the Select Committee on January 6th.  As I have said repeatedly, condemn the unlawful acts at the U.S. Capitol on January 6. Those who threaten, destroy, and steal property betray our fundamental Constitutional rights of free speech and peaceful assembly. Congress and its committees of jurisdiction like the Homeland Security Committee are fully equipped to investigate the events of January 6. They have subpoena power and subject-matter expertise to handle the investigation. Just recently, a bipartisan Senate investigation released comprehensive findings that were the result of serious, constructive and bipartisan work amongst Senate committee staff and leadership. The House of Representatives can and should do the same, but Speaker Pelosi continues to block any meaningful bipartisan cooperation. In addition, the Architect of the Capitol has already been appropriated $10 million to conduct a comprehensive security review of its own, which is entirely nonpartisan. Further, there are ongoing investigations by the DOJ and FBI that have led to over 500 charges or arrests and yielded significant evidence related to the events. The addition of Speaker Pelosi’s select committee is an entirely partisan exercise at the taxpayer's expense. It will cherry pick the evidence to conform to the Democrat's narrative. This bill passed the House by a vote of 222-190.

June 29, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 567, the Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership Program Act of 2021. This bipartisan bill authorizes an interagency program to strengthen counterterrorism operations and better coordinate U.S. assistance to address rising extremism in West and North Africa. In the last year alone, ISIS and Al Qaeda-affiliated terrorist attacks in the Sahel have more than doubled, killing over 4,000 people. A military response alone will not address this threat. That is why it’s vital for a strong, coordinated U.S. response that appropriately balances our diplomatic, development and defense efforts to build capacity in other countries to combat terrorism and address the root causes of extremism. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 395-15.

I voted “No” on H.R. 2662, the Inspector General Independence and Efficiency Act. Despite its name, this bill actually fails to ensure proper protections for former federal employees or maintain the President’s authority, regardless of their party, to expeditiously remove and replace inspectors general (IG). H.R. 2662 goes so far as to limit the President’s ability to remove an IG for dereliction of duty or impropriety and unnecessarily shifts the delicate balance between the Executive Branch and Congress, including by dramatically expanding subpoena authority in a manner that could easily be misused or abused in the future. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 221-182.

I voted “No” on H.R. 3005, Removing Certain Statues from the Capitol. Currently, states select two statues to be displayed in the halls of Congress. This tradition goes back to 1864, and represents the idea that our Constitutional Republic is based on the core principle of federalism. This bill would direct the removal of the bust of Roger B. Taney from the Old Supreme Court Chamber and replace it with a bust of Thurgood Marshall. It also requires the Architect of the Capitol to identify, and the Joint Committee on the Library to remove, all statues in National Statuary Hall of individuals who voluntarily served the Confederacy within 120 days, and within 45 days all other Confederate statues and busts in the Capitol. I am concerned that this bill would provide even greater power to the Joint Committee on the Library, which oversees the placement of the statues, even though this Committee has already exhibited serious bureaucratic flaws. For example, the State of North Carolina voted six years ago to replace a Confederate statue in the Capitol, yet the Committee has not taken any action to make this happen. Similarly, the State of Kansas has been waiting 22 years to put a statue of Amelia Earhart in the Capitol. This lack of action is clearly unacceptable, and suggests that the process could be politically motivated. A better approach to this issue would be to reform the Joint Committee so that it operates less arbitrarily and more effectively, while continuing to give states the ability to make these decisions through the democratic process, as they have for more than a century. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 285-120.

June 28, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 2225, the National Science Foundation for the Future Act.  This bipartisan legislation will increase funding for the National Science Foundation to ensure that industries of the future like quantum information sciences, artificial intelligence, supercomputing, cybersecurity, and advanced manufacturing can continue driving our economic growth and competitiveness. The United States must dedicate more resources to research and development in these areas to foster greater innovation, improve our national security, and maintain our competitive edge over adversaries like China. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 345-67.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 3593, the Department of Energy Science for the Future Act.  This bipartisan bill provides comprehensive policy guidance and funding authorization for the major research programs overseen by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science. This includes research on materials and chemical science, bioscience, climate science, fusion energy, scientific computing, and high energy and nuclear physics. This bill also offers guidance for the Office of Science’s Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists program to broaden participation of underrepresented groups in STEM programs. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 351-68.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 391, the Global Health Security Act of 2021. This legislation reaffirms the United States’ commitment to promoting global health security. This bill directs the President to establish the Global Health Security Agenda Interagency Review Council to review and implement the Global Health Security Agenda, an initiative launched by nearly 30 nations to address global infectious disease threats. The Global Health Security Act will ensure the U.S. can hold other nation’s accountable, while increasing our ability to prepare for and respond to public health threats, and reduce or prevent their spread across borders. This bipartisan legislation passed the House by a vote of 307-112.

June 25, 2021
I voted "No" on S.J. Res. 14, the Methane CRA. Reversing the existing rule on methane, as this resolution does, will not better protect the environment, but it will harm America’s energy independence by re-establishing duplicative and burdensome regulations. This CRA reverses previous reforms and returns regulation of methane emissions to the rigid and overly burdensome framework put in place by the Obama Administration. I oppose this unnecessary and misguided bill because it will contribute to job losses and higher energy costs, while doing little to meaningfully increase environmental protections or reduce emissions, as the Environmental Protection Agency’s own estimates have established. This joint resolution passed the House by a vote of 229 – 191.

June 24, 2021
Today, the House considered two bills and two Congressional Review Act (CRA) Joint Resolutions. CRA Joint Resolutions are used by Congress to overturn rules put in place by a federal agency.

I voted "No" on S.J. Res. 15, the True Lender CRA because reversing this existing rule would hurt community banks in our area. In October 2020, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency issued a final rule to clarify that a bank is the “true lender” of a loan if it is named as the lender in the loan agreement or if it funds the loan. This clarification was necessary to allow smaller community banks to partner with financial technology companies and leverage their resources to offer a broader array of services to customers in communities like ours. It also allows these institutions to increase their ability to compete with larger banks. By reversing the clarification provided by the True Lender Rule, as this joint resolution does, these banks will face uncertainty from conflicting rulings from federal courts on whether the bank or the partnering firm is the originator of the loan. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 218-208.

I voted "No" on H.R. 1443, the LGBTQ Business Equal Credit Enforcement and Investment Act. I strongly support the equal rights and protections of all people, no matter their race, gender, religion, or sexuality. I have concerns that this bill could lead to preferences in the financial sector based on certain classifications. It also arbitrarily excludes certain groups of small businesses that are recognized or protected elsewhere in federal law, such as veteran-owned, Native American, and rural small businesses. As a small business owner, I have concerns whenever the government begins to arbitrarily pick winners and losers. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 252-176. I previously opposed this legislation when it was considered by the House earlier this month as well.

I voted "No" on S.J. Res. 13, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission CRA. This resolution overturns a rule issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) that addresses the conciliation process in federal employment law as a way to resolve employment discrimination allegations through cooperation and voluntary compliance. Specifically, the rule implements reforms that will ensure the EEOC provides respondents with the essential facts and law supporting the claim, and the basis for monetary relief, so that respondents can better evaluate their liability and more promptly voluntarily remediate specific discriminatory practices. Rolling back this rule, as this joint resolution does, will make the conciliation process less effective and transparent, discourage utilization of the process, and lead to a higher percentage of discrimination charges being resolved through costly litigation. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 219-210.

I voted "No" on H.R. 239, the Equal Access to Contraception for Veterans Act.  This bill prohibits the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) from requiring payment from a veteran for any contraceptive item that is required to be covered by health insurance plans without a cost-sharing requirement. The bill would require taxpayers to bear the full cost of contraception through the VA, which includes forms of birth control like Plan B and Ella, which are abortifacients. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 245-181. I previously opposed this legislation when it was considered by the House earlier this month as well.

June 23, 2021
I voted “Yes” on a package of 16 bipartisan bills, which passed the House by a vote of 325-103. This package includes legislation that revises the Consumer Production Safety Commission’s (CPSC) safety standards for freestanding storage units and cribs, and requires the CPSC to establish a program to explore artificial intelligence and blockchain technology. The legislation will also revise the Federal Bar Association and redefine judicial districts in North Carolina. The complete list of bills included in this package is below:

1. H.R. 482 – Newborn Screening Saves Lives Reauthorization Act of 2021
2. H.R. 704 – ARTS Act
3. H.R. 961 – Justice for Juveniles Act
4. H.R. 1314 – STURDY Act
5. H.R. 2679 – Foundation of the Federal Bar Association Charter Amendments Act of 2021, as amended
6. H.R. 2571 – AMIGOS Act
7. H.R. 2694 – Criminal Judicial Administration Act of 2021
8. H.R. 3752 – Pandemic Effects on Home Safety and Tourism Act
9. H.R. 3723 – Consumer Safety Technology Act 
10. H.R. 3182 – Safe Sleep for Babies Act of 2021 
11. H.R. 3841 – Tribal Health Data Improvement Act of 2021
12. H.R. 2922 – Elder Abuse Protection Act of 2021
13. H.R. 3239 – To make improvements in the enactment of title 41, United States Code, into a positive law title and to improve the Code
14. H.R. 3241 – To make improvements in the enactment of title 54, United States Code, into a positive law title and to improve the Code
15. S. 1340 – A bill to amend title 28, United States Code, to redefine the eastern and middle judicial districts of North Carolina
16. S. 409 – To provide for the availability of amounts for customer education initiatives and non-awards expenses of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Whistleblower Program

I voted “No” on H.R. 2062, the Protecting Older Workers Against Discrimination Act.  This bill would overturn a 2009 Supreme Court decision (Gross v. FBL Financial Services, Inc) on the basis that the decision negatively impacted age discrimination cases. Overturning this case allows a plaintiff to argue that age was only a motivating, not decisive, factor that led to an employer’s unfavorable employment action. Allowing such “mixed-motive” claims will eliminate the carefully balanced standard Congress adopted when it passed the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, resulting in more frivolous lawsuits. Unfortunately, H.R. 2062 disregards current law and decades of Supreme Court precedent, which will ultimately reward trial lawyers at the expense of the older American workers the legislation purports to protect. I strongly support protecting any American citizen from discrimination, including that based upon age.  However, all workers are already protected from discrimination through other legislation, and this bill would only blur the lines on the discrimination towards the elderly and create unnecessary litigation which will in turn hurt our seniors. The legislation passed the House by a vote of247-178

June 22, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 1374, the Enhancing State Energy Security Planning and Emergency Preparedness Act of 2021. This bipartisan legislation will amend the 1990 Energy Policy and Conservation Act to provide federal financial assistance to states to improve their emergency planning functions. This includes funding to implement, review, and revise state energy security plans. Elevating energy security planning and emergency preparedness is important and urgent – whether a storm knocks out power to millions of homes or our energy grid is hacked – we must be prepared. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 398-21.

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 983, the Preventing Crimes Against Veterans Act of 2021. This bill protects our veterans from targeted scams and financial predators. H.R. 983 establishes a new criminal offense for knowingly executing, or attempting to execute, a scheme to defraud an individual of veterans' benefits, or in connection with obtaining veteran's benefits for an individual. The bill also imposes a fine or imprisonment of up to five years for defrauding veterans. America’s veterans have put so much on the line to defend our great Nation and safeguard our freedoms. That’s why one of my top priorities in Congress is to ensure every American servicemember and veteran is well-equipped and properly supported, whether they are serving actively or have returned to civilian life. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 416-5.

June 17, 2021
I voted “No” on H.R. 256, to repeal the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002. This bill repeals current counterterrorism authorities without standing up a replacement that is scoped to current national security threats. H.R. 256 would only repeal the 2002 AUMF, which provides continuing legal authority for military operations against terrorist threats in Iraq, including Iran-backed militias. Repeal without a replacement sends the wrong message, and will only embolden our terrorist adversaries, including Iran and ISIS. It is critical that we undertake real war powers reform with an updated AUMF to address current threats, rather than play politics with national security. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 268-161. 

June 16, 2021 
I voted “No” on H.R. 1187, the Corporate Governance Improvement and Investor Protection Act. This legislation would politicize the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission by implementing a one-size-fits-all disclosure regime for publicly traded companies that will increase costs, discourage investment, and deter private companies from going public. H.R. 1187 would impose enormous compliance costs on public companies by vastly expanding required disclosures on environmental, social, and governance issues, including climate change and pay practices, with little to no congressional oversight. Public company reporting requirements are already extensive and protect investors by requiring companies to share information relevant to any investment risks. This bill does not increase transparency, instead it misuses the Securities and Exchange Commission to advance a progressive agenda that will end up hurting our economy. It will also harm American families that actively invest in the market or have retirement plans that do. Although this bill faced bipartisan opposition, it passed the House by a slim margin of 215-214.

I voted “Yes” on S.475, the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act. This bill establishes June 19 as an annual federal holiday known as, “Juneteenth National Independence Day.” Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, the day when Union troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, freeing the last remaining enslaved African Americans and marking the end of slavery in the United States.  In 1980, Texas became the first state to designate Juneteenth as a state holiday.  Since then, forty-eight other states and the District of Columbia have commemorated or recognized this important day in our Nation’s history.  S.475 passed the Senate by unanimous consent yesterday and today passed the House by a vote of 415-14.

June 15, 2021
I voted “Yes” on a package of 10 bipartisan bills, which passed the House by a vote of 287-140. This package includes legislation that will protect consumers, veterans , and our environment. The package also included a bill I cosponsored to provide a congressional Gold Medal to the Harlem Hellfighters. The complete list of bills included in this package is below:

1. H.R. 293 - VA Hospitals Establishing Leadership Performance Act
2. H.R. 587 - Ocean Pollution Reduction Act II
3. H.R. 610 - San Francisco Bay Restoration Act
4. H.R. 1144 - PUGET SOS Act
5. H.R. 1703 - National Children’s Museum Act
6. H.R. 1921 - To amend the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to reauthorize the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Restoration Program, and for other purposes
7. H.R. 2008 - Local Water Protection Act
8. H.R. 2332 - Debt Bondage Repair Act
9. H.R. 3642 - Harlem Hellfighters Congressional Gold Medal Act
10. H.R. 2545 - To amend title 38, United States Code, to clarify the role of doctors of podiatric medicine in the Department of Veterans Affairs, and for other purposes

I voted "No" on H.R. 239, the Equal Access to Contraception for Veterans Act.  This bill prohibits the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) from requiring payment from a veteran for any contraceptive item that is required to be covered by health insurance plans without a cost-sharing requirement. The bill would require taxpayers to bear the full cost of contraception through the VA, which includes forms of birth control like Plan B and Ella, which are abortifacients. This legislation required two-thirds to pass the House and failed by a vote margin of 240-188.

I voted "Yes" on H.R. 3325, to award four congressional gold medals to the United States Capitol Police and those who protected the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021.  I have consistently condemned the actions of January 6, and applaud the heroism of the United States Capitol Police officers who defended our Nation’s Capital.  The legislation passed the House by a bipartisan vote of 406-21.

I voted "No" on H.R. 1443, the LGBTQ Business Equal Credit Enforcement and Investment Act. I strongly support the equal rights and protections of all people, no matter their race, gender, religion, or sexuality. I have concerns that this bill could lead to preferences in the financial sector based on certain classifications. It also arbitrarily excludes certain groups of small businesses that are recognized or protected elsewhere in federal law, such as veteran-owned, Native American, and rural small businesses. As a small business owner, I have concerns whenever the government begins to arbitrarily pick winners and losers. This legislation required two-thirds to pass the House and failed by a vote margin of 248-177.

May 20, 2021
Today, I voted “No” on H.R. 3237, the Emergency Security Supplemental Bill to Respond to January 6th Appropriations Act.  This bill puts the cart before the horse by appropriating $1.9 billion in emergency funding for, among other things, security upgrades to the Capitol before committees and the Architect of the Capitol have even determined what upgrades need to be made. House Democrats ended good faith negotiations with Republicans on this funding bill to once again make political headlines rather than good policy. One of the most troubling parts about this partisan bill is that it creates a $250 million slush fund to cover future unknown costs, without any guidelines for how these funds will or should be spent. It also provides $200 million to establish a Quick Reaction Force within the Washington, D.C. National Guard, which has raised serious concerns from Democrats and Republicans alike about the militarization of the Capitol and oversight of critical security functions in Congress. A proposal like this should be subjected to further scrutiny and debate by Congress before being rushed through the House. This bill was passed by a vote of 213-212-3.

May 19, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 1629, the Fairness in Orphan Drug Exclusivity Act. This bill would institute limitations on market exclusivity for drugs designated as “orphan drugs” under Section 526(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. This bipartisan bill closes a loophole that could be used to block pharmaceutical competition and prevent innovative treatments for rare conditions affecting fewer than 200,000 people from coming to market. I support commonsense bills like this that eliminate barriers for innovative medical-assisted treatments, boost competition, and drive down the cost of new medicine. This legislation passed the House by a wide margin vote of 402-23. I previously supported this legislation when it was considered by the House earlier this month as well.

I voted “No” on H. Res. 275, Condemning the horrific shootings in Atlanta, Georgia, on March 16, 2021.  I strongly oppose discrimination and hate in all forms and just yesterday voted for a bill to provide the Department of Justice more resources to investigate hate crimes. However, this resolution erodes the rule of law by assuming facts in a case that have yet to be proven in court. This establishes a dangerous precedent for the House of Representatives, which should respect the independence of the judiciary and the role of law enforcement in conducting fair, transparent, and impartial investigations without undue influence. The shootings in Atlanta were horrific and I condemn them in the strongest terms. Their motivation has yet to be determined and should be left for a jury to decide based on facts, not influenced by political decisions made in advance by Congress. This resolution passed the House by a vote of 244-180.

I voted “No” on H.R. 3233, the National Commission to Investigate the January 6 Attack on the United States Capitol Complex Act. I condemn the unlawful acts at the US Capitol on January 6. Those who threaten, destroy, and steal property betray our fundamental Constitutional rights of free speech and peaceful assembly. Congress has the authority and the obligation to investigate the events of January 6 and should take steps to prevent lawlessness from occurring again. Congress and its committees of jurisdiction are fully equipped to handle this inquiry. They have subpoena power and subject-matter expertise. Most importantly, members of Congress must be accountable to the people, unlike a commission staffed with unelected, partisan appointees.  I fear that this commission is little more than a fishing expedition at the taxpayer's expense and will cherry pick the evidence to conform to the Democrat's narrative. Targeting individual members based on political views is also a grave concern. The very last revelation an outcome based inquiry will produce is the truth.  This commission passed the House by a vote of 252-175. The bill now goes to the Senate where it needs 60 votes to pass. 

May 18, 2021
I voted “Yes” on S.937, the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act. This bipartisan bill will expedite the review of hate crimes, especially those that occurred during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. In particular, the bill designates a point person within the Justice Department to oversee efforts to ensure COVID-19-related hate crimes are reviewed in a timely manner and to provide additional support to local law enforcement agencies responding to such incidents. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 364-62. It passed the Senate earlier this year by a vote of 94-1. It will now be delivered to President Biden for his signature.

I voted “Yes” on a package of 21 bipartisan bills, which passed the House by a vote of 350-75. This package includes legislation that will support our nation’s veterans, protect our environment, boost STEM research, ensure fair access to our financial system, and secure our country’s foreign and diplomatic interests. As a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, I am especially pleased that the bipartisan State Department Authorization Act was included in this package. This bill will ensure the Department of State and our nation’s diplomats have the resources to advance our interests abroad.

The list of bills included in this package is below:

1. H.R. 2704 - Improving VA Accountability to Prevent Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Act of 2021
2. H.R. 2788 - Equal Employment Counseling Modernization Act
3. H.R. 240 - Homeless Veterans with Children Reintegration Act
4. H.R. 711 - West LA VA Campus Improvement Act of 2021, as amended
5. H.R. 2167 - GI Bill National Emergency Extended Deadline Act, as amended
6. H.R. 2878 - Native VetSuccess at Tribal Colleges and Universities Pilot Program Act, as amended
7. H.R. 1510 - To direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to submit to Congress a report on the use of cameras in the medical centers of the Department of Veterans Affairs
8. H.R. 2494 - To amend title 38, United States Code, to establish in the Department the Veterans Economic Opportunity and Transition Administration, and for other purposes
9. H.R. 2441 - Sgt. Ketchum Rural Veterans Mental Health Act
10. H.R. 1447 - COAST Research Act of 2021, as amended
11. H.R. 2533 - NEAR Act of 2021
12. H.R. 210 - Rural STEM Education Research Act, as amended
13. H.R. 144 - Supporting Early-Career Researchers Act, as amended
14. H.R. 204 - STEM Opportunities ACT, as amended
15. H.R. 2027 - MSI STEM Achievement Act
16. H.R. 2695 - Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act
17. H.R. 1157 - Department of State Authorization Act of 2021, as amended 
18. H.R. 1711 - Financial Inclusion in Banking Act of 2021, as amended 
19. H.R. 2655 - Insider Trading Prohibition Act 
20. H.R. 3008 - Homebuyer Assistance Act of 2021
21. H.R. 707 - Ghost Army Congressional Gold Medal Act

May 17, 2021
Today, I voted “Yes” on H.R. 2911, the VA Transparency and Trust Act. This bipartisan legislation would direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to provide information to Congress on a regular basis regarding how the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is using the tens of billions of dollars in emergency relief funding it received during the pandemic. It would also require the VA Inspector General and the Government Accountability Office to audit and report publicly on the VA’s emergency relief spending. This good governance bill provides needed transparency to ensure that the VA is a responsible steward of taxpayer money and that our veterans are receiving the care, resources, and support they deserve and have earned. The legislation passed the House by a vote of 411-4.

May 14, 2021
Today, I voted ‘Yes” on H.R. 1065, the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. This bipartisan legislation would establish additional workplace protections for pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions. This bill includes safeguards and exemptions for small businesses and other employers, who are not required to make accommodations if they impose an undue hardship on their businesses. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 315-101.

May 13, 2021
I voted “No” on H.R. 2547, the Comprehensive Debt Collection Improvement Act. This legislation consisted of a package of several partisan bills that would fundamentally and negatively transform the consumer credit market by making it more expensive for borrowers to access credit, increase costs for small businesses, deny access to credit for the lowest income borrowers, and undo efforts to modernize payment collection. The bottom line is that H.R. 2547 makes extending credit more expensive across the board, and could even push lower income borrowers out of the system entirely. Unfortunately, this legislation passed the House by a vote of 215-207. 

I voted “Yes” on H.R. 2877, the Behavioral Intervention Guidelines Act of 2021. This bill enables the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in consultation with the U.S. Department of Education and a wide array of other stakeholders to develop best practices for the proper use and implementation of behavioral intervention programs to help communities identify the earliest signs of violence to self or others. It is imperative that school administrators, teachers, and students have the mental health resources they need. This critical legislation will provide schools and communities the tools to ensure the safety and health of every student. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 323-93-2.

May 12, 2021
Today, I voted “Yes” on a package of 16 bipartisan bills, which passed the House by a vote of 349-74. The package included two bills I cosponsored, H.R. 1448, the PAWs Act and H.R. 433, the Family Support Services for Addiction Act. The PAWs Act would allow the Department of Veterans Affairs to create a pilot program on dog training therapy and provide service dogs to veterans with mental illnesses. H.R. 433 provides support for individuals and families struggling with substance use disorder. The legislative package also included a range of other important bills, including several more that provide additional resources to Americans struggling with mental health illness and that enhance suicide prevention services and training. Other legislation included in the package addresses child abuse in tribal communities. Supporting mental health is critical to supporting our communities, especially as we recover from a pandemic. I was pleased to see these bills pass the House of Representatives.

The complete list of bills included in this package is below:

 

1. H.R. 433 - Family Support Services for Addiction Act of 2021
2. H.R. 1475 - Pursuing Equity in Mental Health Act, as amended
3. H.R. 586 - STANDUP Act of 2021
4. H.R. 721 - Mental Health Services for Students Act of 2021, as amended
5. H.R. 1260 - Bipartisan Solution to Cyclical Violence Act of 2021, as amended
6. H.R. 1205 - Improving Mental Health Access from the Emergency Department Act of 2021
7. H.R. 1324 - Effective Suicide Screening and Assessment in the Emergency Department Act of 2021
8. H.R. 1480 - HERO Act, as amended
9. H.R. 2862 - Campaign to Prevent Suicide Act, as amended
10. H.R. 2981 - Suicide Prevention Lifeline Improvement Act of 2021
11. H.R. 2955 - Suicide Prevention Act
12. H.R. 768 - Block, Report, And Suspend Suspicious Shipments Act of 2021
13. H.R. 1448 - PAWS for Veterans Therapy Act, as amended
14. H.R. 297 - To require the Secretary of Agriculture to conduct a study on the establishment of, and the potential land that could be included in, a unit of the National Forest System in the State of Hawaii, and for other purposes
15. H.R. 478 - Blackwater Trading Post Land Transfer Act
16. H.R. 810 - To amend the National Trails System Act to direct the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a study on the feasibility of designating the Chief Standing Bear National Historic Trail, and for other purposes

May 11, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 1629, the Fairness in Orphan Drug Exclusivity Act. This bill would institute limitations on market exclusivity for drugs designated as “orphan drugs” under Section 526(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. This bipartisan bill closes a loophole that could be used to block pharmaceutical competition and prevent innovative treatments for rare conditions affecting fewer than 200,000 people from coming to market. I support commonsense bills like this that eliminate barriers for innovative medical-assisted treatments, boost competition, and drive down the cost of new medicine. This legislation required two-thirds to pass the House and failed by a vote margin of 250-168.

April 22, 2021
I voted "No" on H.R. 51, regarding District of Columbia Statehood. This partisan legislation would unconstitutionally create a fifty-first state from land that was intentionally set aside to constitute the federal district for the nation’s Capital. This should not be a partisan issue. In fact, the Justice Department under both Democratic and Republican presidents has consistently agreed over the last 60 years that statehood can only be achieved through a constitutional amendment – it cannot simply be done by one majority vote in Congress, which is what House Democrats are proposing today. As legislators who take an oath to the Constitution, we must actually follow it. Sadly, today’s vote doesn’t align with the Constitution or the facts. But this push to make Washington, D.C. a state isn’t about the facts or fairness, it’s about politics. House Democrats have made no secret about wanting to add two seats to the Senate so they can more easily push through progressive agenda items like the Green New Deal, eliminating the filibuster, packing the Supreme Court, and defunding the police. While this may be their objective, they cannot go around the Constitution to do it, which is why I opposed this bill. H.R. 51 was adopted by a vote of 216-208.

April 21, 2021
I voted “Yes” on H.R. 1392, the Protection of Saudi Dissidents Act of 2021. This bill makes certain that Saudi dissidents in the United States are protected from political and financial retribution from the Government of Saudi Arabia. At the core our great republic stands a belief that freedom of speech and freedom of assembly must be always be preserved and defended. I voted "Yes" on this bipartisan bill because Saudi Arabia must be held accountable for harming the individual rights and freedoms of dissenters, both inside Saudi Arabia and outside the country. This bill will not impact our ability to protect Saudi Arabia from outside threats, including threats posed by the Iranian regime. Iran has previously attacked Saudi Arabia’s oil infrastructure and the United States must continue to support our partners in the region against Iran’s malign activity. The bill provides a clear exception for arms sales for the defense of Saudi territory from external threats and for the protection of U.S. government personnel and facilities, which I strongly support. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 350-71.

I voted “No” on H.R. 1333, the No Ban Act. This bill restricts the President’s authority to suspend or restrict entry of certain aliens on the basis that their entry would be detrimental to the interests of the United States due to a variety of threats, including to U.S. national security, financial markets, and public health. This bill creates dangerous limitations on all future presidents, Republican and Democrat alike. It limits their ability to keep the United States safe by placing onerous restrictions on their use of the 212(f) authority under current law, instead transferring greater power to unelected federal bureaucrats who are unaccountable to the American people. I voted against this legislation because it weakens our national security and invites litigation against the U.S. government for making decisions that are in the interest of our country. Most importantly, it does absolutely nothing to address the surging border crisis. This legislation passed the House by a vote of 218-208.

I also voted “No” on H.R. 1573, the Access to Counsel Act of 2021. This bill provides the right to consult with counsel for persons referred to secondary inspection at a U.S. port of entry. Requiring access to counsel during secondary inspections would severely affect the ability of Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) agents to quickly and safely screen millions of people and goods brought into the United States. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimates this bill would cost American taxpayers $825 million over the next 5 years. I voted “No” on H.R. 1573 because we are in the middle of an unprecedented border crisis and this bill would negatively impact CBP’s ability to facilitate lawful trade and travel at a time when they are already stretched thin and under resourced. More unaccompanied children crossed illegally into the United States last month than ever before, and the problem is continuing to worsen as a result of the Biden Administration’s policies.  Our law enforcement agencies are so burdened that they are having difficulty complying with existing laws and regulations. It is irresponsible and out of touch for Congress to think that now is the time to place even more restrictions and mandates on CBP. Their focus must be on responding to the border crisis, and Congress should be coming together to make sure law enforcement has the tools, resources, and funding to do it effectively. The House adopted this legislation by a vote of 217-207.

April 20, 2021
Today, I voted “Yes” on a package of 16 bipartisan bills, which passed the House by a vote of 355-69. This legislative package included a range of important bills and legislative fixes, including ones to foster greater growth, increase strategic planning at the Department of Homeland Security, and address errors in the Trusted Traveler Program. Other bills included in this package will strengthen global cybersecurity programs, protect seniors from financial scams, advance initiatives for young leaders and entrepreneurs in Africa, and reiterate our Nation’s strong support for the people of Belarus and their democratic aspirations as they strive for greater freedom.

The complete list of bills included in this package is below:

1. H.R. 2523 - Training in High-demand Roles to Improve Veteran Employment Act
2. H.R. 490 - DHS MORALE Act
3. H.R. 370 - Quadrennial Homeland Security Review Technical Corrections Act of 2021
4. H.R. 367 - Homeland Security Acquisition Professional Career Program Act
5. H.R. 408 - Department of Homeland Security Mentor-Protégé Program Act of 2021
6. H.R. 397 - CBRN Intelligence and Information Sharing Act of 2021
7. H.R. 396 - Transit Security Grant Program Flexibility Act
8. H.R. 1532 - Improving FHA Support for Small Dollar Mortgages Act of 2021
9. H.R. 1491 - Fair Debt Collection for Servicemembers Act
10. H.R. 1395 - Housing Financial Literacy Act of 2021
11. H.R. 1565 - Senior Security Act
12. H.R. 1528 - Promoting Transparent Standards for Corporate Insiders Act
13. H.R. 1602 - Eliminate Barriers to Innovation Act of 2021
14. H.R. 1251 - Cyber Diplomacy Act of 2021
15. H.Res. 124 - Supporting the people of Belarus and their democratic aspirations and condemning the election rigging and subsequent violent crackdowns on peaceful protesters by the illegitimate Lukashenka regime
16. H.R. 965 - YALI Act of 2021

April 19, 2021
H.R. 1996, the SAFE Banking Act of 2021 prohibits the federal government from penalizing a depository institution for providing banking services to a cannabis-related business operating legally in a state. I voted “Yes” on this bipartisan bill. While I have serious concerns with state-passed legislation legalizing marijuana, our small businesses and banking institutions shouldn’t pay the price. Current discrepancies between state and federal laws regarding marijuana create real uncertainty for small lenders and financial institutions. This bill ensures they will not be negatively impacted for complying with state law. This legislation was passed by the House by a vote of 321-101.

H.Res. 130 rightly condemns the People's Republic of China and the Government of Hong Kong for violating the human rights and individual freedoms of the people of Hong Kong. It also reaffirms American support for democratic protestors in Hong Kong and encourages the President to aid Hong Kong residents. I voted "Yes" on H.Res. 130. As a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, holding China accountable is one of my top priorities. We must continue to call out China for its ongoing efforts to extinguish democracy and freedom in Hong Kong, and elsewhere around the world. This legislation was passed by the House by a vote of 418-1.